Devecikonagi Dam and Hydropower Project

In order to maximize the energy generation, the highest possible head is achieved by keeping the operating water level same as flood level with a five radial gate-controlled-spillway.
 

Project Information

Client: BM Holding

Location: Bursa

Status: Completed

 

 

Key Features

Total Installed Capacity 29 MW

RCC Dam

Run-of-River Type

Pondage Storage 

Reservoir

Irrigarion

Large Radial Gates

Semi-Indoor Powerhouse

Vertical Kaplan Turbine

Riverbed Excavation

 

 

Summary

Devecikonagi Dam and Hydropower Project is a storage regulation type hydroelectric development that is constructed over Emet Stream. The construction of the project started in September 2010 and the project is in operation since 2012. Kizkayasi Dam and HEPP are going to be constructed at the upstream of Devecikonagi Dam and HEPP project.

RCC Dam

Due to the facts that the body of the dam is RCC (Roller Compacted Concrete) and 40 m high from foundation. The spillway is designed for Q500 flood discharge which is 2,545 m3/s. In order to maximize the energy generation, the highest possible head is achieved by keeping the operating water level same as flood level with a five radial gate-controlled-spillway. Dam reservoir is 660.000 sq.m in area and 6.2 M cu.m in volume at the operating water level, 95 m. The dam has an active storage of 1.9 M cu.m to carry out the daily regulation. The crest length of the body constructed within the scope of the project is 298 m including spillway and the total RCC volume is about 60.000 cu.m.

Semi Indoor Powerhouse

The semi indoor powerhouse located on the toe of the dam contains three Kaplan type turbines; two of them have equal hydraulic capacities of 57.5 m3/s and the other one has 5 m3/s.

Energy from Irrigation Water

Low capacity turbine was designed to supply water needed for Dolluk-Gulluce Irrigation Project constructed by the State Hydraulic Works as well as to generate energy using this water.

Riverbed Excavation

At the tailrace of Devecikonagi Dam, a riverbed excavation is carried out up to 7 m depth to reduce the downstream water level, thereby reducing the amount of inundated agricultural lands which in turn reduces the negative social effects as well as expropriation cost and increases the amount of energy production.